• @moody@lemmings.world
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    665 months ago

    You’re comparing cheddar to parmigiano. Those are two completely different styles of cheeses. Try the same recipe with a parmigiano and a grana padano, and it will be much closer, and you very well may appreciate the difference in price between the two.

    • @Gabu@lemmy.world
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      45 months ago

      Implying that all cheeses of the same type are roughly equal is insanity if you actually cook. Even between different producers of the same region in the same country you can get wildly different texture, humidity, flavor, behavior when heated, etc.

      • @moody@lemmings.world
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        5 months ago

        That wasn’t the implication I was trying to make. I was saying that if you’re used to cooking with cheddar, you don’t replace it with parmigiano, and vice versa. They don’t serve the same purpose in cooking. If you’re cooking carbonara with cheddar, you’re obviously going to be disappointed in the result. If you cook a carbonara with grana padano instead of parmigiano, you’re like 90% of the way there, and most people won’t know the difference. They’re not equivalent but they’re similar.

      • oce 🐆
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        35 months ago

        Cooking cheese makes it lose a lot of taste. If you really want to appreciate the specificities of cheese, you should eat it raw. Also don’t forget to take it out of the fridge 30 min before so the fat is not cold and carries more flavor.

      • @Knightfox@lemmy.one
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        15 months ago

        I think you’re understating the difference between cheap Cheddar and authentic Parma.

        It’s like when the recipe calls for a glass of dry white wine, but the person exchanges it for Colt 45 malt liquor and thinks the recipe was the problem.

    • I understand that those are completely different but most people don’t buy authentic Parmigiano, pecorino romano or grana padano(I need to try this one). They use the regular plain cheese you buy in the big box stores. So to the average person putting a micro chip in a cheese wheel (which I read wasn’t even true) is an absurd notion. But I was pointing out that the regular cheddar/mozzarella the average person buys is bland garbage compared to these cheeses. I think people should try them and they will realize why they care so much about its authenticity.

      • @0ops@lemm.ee
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        105 months ago

        You might as well say that “Hamburger patties are bland garbage compared to pickles”

        Softer cheeses like mozzarella and cheddar have a totally different job than hard cheeses like Romano and Parmesan. Mozzarella and cheddar provide body, texture, a neutral flavor, and lots of calories. Romano and Parmesan provide only flavor, and can be used to complement - not replace - the milder soft cheeses

        • @tocopherol@lemmy.dbzer0.com
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          5 months ago

          This poster seems to just be saying if you’ve had cheap regular cheese you are amazed when you have legit authentic cheeses like these. A lot of the cheese people buy, in the US at least, is just some basic shit often called ‘cheddar’ or whatever but not truly authentic cheddar or mozzarella.

      • @moody@lemmings.world
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        5 months ago

        I agree that people should try them, and they are superior to cheap, mass-produced supermarket cheeses. But even a cheaper imitation parmigiano (I’m not talking about the powdered “cheese” you get in a Kraft bottle) is close enough to “certified” stuff that if you want to save some money, you can approximate it with something nearly equivalent for half the price. And if you don’t have an especially sensitive palate, you may not even be able to tell the difference.

        • @jpeps@lemmy.world
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          15 months ago

          I always buy what in my country is typically called “Italian Hard Cheese” for legal reasons. It’s as you say, a very close approximation to the real thing if you’re not too discerning. Main reason for me is that I don’t like parmigiano’s insistence on using rennet from calves.

        • I’m sure that’s true. I’ve never had the imitation stuff so I don’t know how they compare. I’ve just been blown away by how good they are that it justifies the price for me. They are very strong cheeses so you don’t need to use much. I vacuum seal them after every use so they last forever.

          On a semi-related note, Guanciale is ridiculously expensive and that I can’t justify buying no matter how much I want to make authentic Carbonara.