1. Chainmail provides little to no protection against impact damage. As we saw in Fellowship, evil beings who attack heroes in bed use slashing attacks with broadswords or similar weapons. While it might prevent cuts, it’s basically like being beaten with an iron rod that will break bones and rupture organs. It is unsuitable as armor. That’s leaving aside weapons like maces, hammers, and clubs, or a Seal Team Six scenario.
    2. It’s aluminum. Or aluminium, if you’re that kind of person. This is basically a blanket designed by Jony Ive. It doesn’t warm. It doesn’t protect. But it’s thin and lightweight. Which is the opposite of what you want in a weighted blanket.
    3. You can buy weighted blankets that come in a variety of weights and warmth characteristics for a fraction of the time investment used to make this. The money you save could be used to buy a home security system that includes a minefield or electric fence. If you’re impressed by what a claymore sword can do to an orc, wait until you see what a claymore mine can do.
    • Neato
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      1022 months ago

      I know #1 is a joke but for everyone else in history that’s why people wore the aketon, or gambeson or padded/quilted tunic under mail. Provided impact protection and made mail more comfortable!

      • @snooggums@midwest.social
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        482 months ago

        And the combo of padding + rings was more effective against cutting and blunt weapons than either on their own! And it was easy to maintain, repair, and the mail could be transferred from person to person with some addition or subtraction of rings.

        Just all around quality protection.

    • @z00s@lemmy.world
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      2 months ago

      Literally anything you can DIY yourself can be bought at a lower dollar and/or time cost. That’s not why people make things.

      There are many reasons why people make things, but generally speaking it’s because you can make exactly what you want, in terms of size, material and design.

      It’s fun, interesting, you learn stuff, and you get the joy of doing. This guy didn’t want an off the shelf weighted blanket, even if it is cheaper/easier to get/whatever.

      Sometimes, when you make things, they don’t work. Or you realise that you made the wrong thing, or made it the wrong way. But that’s when you get the buzz of knowing that you learned something, and the excitement of planning how to do it better.

      Knitting takes a long time and the yarn usually costs more than a machine made version would. But I have friends who still have beanies and scarves that I made them 10 years ago when I was learning to knit. Why? Because they know that I made it for them, which gives them feels.

    • _NoName_
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      32 months ago

      Claymore mines are terrifying. Most commonly, though, they are used in large open areas and may be problematic if your home is not rural.

      Claymores fire steel balls at a wide 60 degree angle. It’s stated that they are guaranteed a kill at 50 meters but can still be dangerous out past 150 meters.

      While claymores are often depicted as being laser or tripwire activated, they are most often activated using a clacker detonator held by an operator. They can be rigged to detonate via both electrical and mechanical means, so they can potentially be activated by a variety of methods.

      • I have an Army background (from a long fucking time ago). I was always amused by “Front Towards Enemy,” and we were trained to click three times.

        I still think the joke works though.

    • @huquad@lemmy.ml
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      62 months ago

      This will protect me from the harmful Covid causing 5g rays I’ve heard so much about.

  • @BradleyUffner@lemmy.world
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    2 months ago

    Every time I’ve messed with chain mail it’s always felt like it’s ripping out my body hair. This looks like torture.

            • @nilloc@discuss.tchncs.de
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              32 months ago

              It’s used as electrodes for TIG welding torches. It was originally specified for aerospace and nuclear welding jobs because it’s really durable and handles heat well. And then it became popular everywhere else for the same reasons.

              Now it’s supposed to be used less, but a lot of guys still like it for its consistency. If you don’t grind it to sharpen it it’s pretty safe to handle. So you can get pre ground electrodes for high end welding work.

      • @shalafi@lemmy.world
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        72 months ago

        I’ll say this for the thick girls, they’re cool on the outside and don’t bitch about freezing. Meanwhile, my 95lb. wife, permanently frozen and shedding heat like a hummingbird.

        First thing in the morning, sweating my ass off, legs glued together…

        “Babe! Let me embrace you!”

        "Get OFF! pant, pant, pant

          • @Kyyrypyy@lemmy.world
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            52 months ago

            Well, fat is insulant, so it helps to keep the heat energy inside the body. Fat, therefore, also provides some protection against cold. On the other hand, if you live in areas with higher ambient temperature, it is more comfortable to be able to exhaust that heat, instead of storing it.

            So, yes, it is a feature?

              • @Kyyrypyy@lemmy.world
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                22 months ago

                And I meant, that as fat has insulating properties, the lack of fat, ergo “tiny body” does not have insulating properties. Thus, a tiny body exhausts more heat, and therefore 1) feel cold more easily and 2) heats the surrounding area.

                So yes, tiny bodytype tends to exhaust heat under a blanket.

      • @Bandicoot_Academic@lemmy.one
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        62 months ago

        The brittlenes apparently depends on the form it takes (polycrystalline or single-crystalline). And while there are some radioactive isotopes of tungsten most of them are synthetic and only made in a lab. The vast majority of the tungsten found on earth is stable.

    • @Taniwha420@lemmy.world
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      62 months ago

      No. The Latin ending -ium designates that something comes from a place. Like, magnesium was originally found in Magnesia. Aluminia is not a place. It’s name is derived from the Latin word ‘alumen’ for aluminum oxide.

      This is what happens when you let people read the Bible in English.

      • @crispy_kilt@feddit.de
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        72 months ago

        The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element.

      • @Xtallll@lemmy.blahaj.zone
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        2 months ago

        In the original book it was written as aluminum, the British publisher, got it wrong and the country has been saying it wrong ever since.

        • @crispy_kilt@feddit.de
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          2 months ago

          the country has been saying it wrong ever since

          If by country you mean the USA (and its northern colony). Literally everyone else in every language that matters spells it aluminium.

          Also, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) adopted aluminium as the standard international name for the element.

  • originalucifer
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    92 months ago

    nice work, but the guys got some pretty stupid ideas on what ‘a man’ is